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Tag Archive 'organizational_behavior'

I work remotely for a company based in Sydney, Australia. The company has been around for over ten years, and my virtual team has been a part of the company for three. Our biggest communication problem as an organization is using the wrong medium to convey information. The Sydney office relies on real-time communication such as instant messaging and informal face-to-face discussions. Unfortunately, the 15 hour time difference means that this communication is happening while my team is asleep. Additionally, the only real-time communication that happens between the Sydney office and my team occurs between myself and my manager once every two weeks. Unfortunately, this means that a lot of important information is being missed by my team. To improve on this, I have encouraged my company to rely less on real-time communication for company-wide communication. For example, news of a bonus might be communicated via e-mail rather than instant messaging. Sadly, the company is so far unable to change its ways, and the communication problem has severely impacted the morale of the US team.

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[QFD] Team Dynamics

Process losses are the largest obstacles to team success. Process losses result from the interactions that are necessary to keep the team functioning, but do not result in the output of the team’s objective. This includes settling disputes, developing understanding, and negotiating roles. Managers can overcome process losses by designing teams that are composed of individuals that will work well together. Additionally, investing in team development early in team formation can prevent process losses in the future when team effectiveness may be more crucial. Finally, focusing on team cohesion may help to create a team that can focus on the task at hand with little or no need to struggle with issues that lead to process losses.

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[QFD] Decision Making and Creativity

When faced with a problem such as the inability to attract high-quality personnel, I would not rely solely on my ability to recognize and solve the problem. My approach to the problem may be biased. For example, it may be the case that my job definitions are uninteresting to the kind of personnel I am hoping to attract. Since I designed the job definitions, perceptual defense (p. 191) might prevent me from seeing the jobs as the problem rather than some other factor. It would be really interesting in this case to get honest feedback from candidates that turned down job offers as to why they turned down the offer. That would be an excellent way to see what about the job (definition, pay structure, etc.) made the job unattractive.

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[QFD] Applied Performance Practices

The two most effective measures organizations can take to improve the effectiveness of financial rewards is to increase the relevancy of rewards and ensure that rewards are valued. The more employees are able to see that their performance directly impacts a reward, the more relevant that reward is. Rewards that can not be influenced by employee performance have little chance of improving work performance. Similarly, if employees do not place a high enough value on a reward, those rewards are hardly motivational. In fact, as our textbook illustrates, rewards that are low value may actually backfire and serve to demotivate employees (p. 165).

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From my experience, loyalty and long service to a single employer is a thing of the past. At one time, employees were rewarded for long service (for example, pension plans and increased vacation time). Additionally, the stigma of changing companies frequently has all but been removed. In fact, managers often consider it healthy for a worker to change roles frequently. Effectively, there has been a shift in the performance to outcome expectancy of employees. They are no longer rewarded for long service, and in fact are incentivised to leave for improved pay.

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